Vaccine vial Credit: Asian Development Bank / Asian Development Bank

“Experts” in the Isle of Man Government are continuing to put Manx lives at risk. This is shocking, and this emotional and scientifically-based reasoning shows why. This is such an incredibly powerful point, that I cannot improve upon the original post by Alex Tabarrok, and thus, I’ve reproduced it in its entirely below.

Of course, given the much lower, probably zero, current transmission of the virus in the Isle of Man, the risk is lower. But the total future risk of the virus spreading on the Isle of Man is not nil, and there is likely to be a risk for months to come. That’s why it is important to deploy the vaccine to as many people as possible, as quickly as possible. It’s why the current policy of keeping 11,716 vaccine doses in Manx freezers, (as of the time of writing) rather than putting them into people, is dangerous and puts Manx lives at risk.

The text below was published first as Osterholm on First Doses First on the Marginal Revolution blog:

Here from a podcast is Michael Osterholm, Regents Professor, McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) and state epidemiologist for the Minnesota Department of Health.

…Imagine you are setting across the table from two people both of whom are 65 or older, both with underlying health conditions. You have two doses of vaccine, one in each hand. And you say to them I can give two doses to you or to you but then the other person gets nothing. Or I can give one dose to both of you. And this is what I know. At the very least, one dose is likely to prevent serious illness, hospitalization and death. Two doses will probably even prevent clinical disease with B.1.1.7. But the other one of you; if you get infected with this virus, which I think substantial numbers of Americans will, things are not looking good for you. What do you want me to do?

If that is your Mom or Dad. Your Grandpa or Grandma. What would you do?

This is where the rubber meets the road. I think if the data bears it out we can save so many lives in the upcoming weeks and we are missing that opportunity.

I have already made my choice. I am postponing my second dose. I want my second dose. But I am confident that I can wait. And I can only hope that my second dose, which I have just deferred, will go to someone who it will save their life. It will make a totally different world for that family.

You know some could argue that this could be the end of my career. But I could not sleep with myself at night if I didn’t do this. I just know in my heart of hearts that this is something we must do if we are going to save lives.

The entire podcast is worthwhile, this is from around minute 44:30 (my imperfect transcription).